close

Kontakt

hessische Film- und Medienakademie (hFMA)
Hermann-Steinhäuser-Straße 43-47, 2.OG
63065 Offenbach am Main
Phone +49 (69) 830 460 41

Anfahrtsbeschreibung hier

Sie erreichen uns in der Kernzeit montags bis freitags von 10.00 - 16.30 Uhr. 

Geschäftsführung
Anja Henningsmeyer (montags bis donnerstags) - a.henningsmeyer@hfmakademie.de

Mitarbeiter*innen
Ilka Brosch (dienstags und mittwochs) - brosch@hfmakademie.de
Csongor Dobrotka (freitags) - dobrotka@hfmakademie.de
Klaus Schüller (donnerstags und freitags) - schueller@hfmakademie.de
Mariana Schneider (mittwochs und donnerstags) - info@hfmakademie.de

  • Alle
  • Öffentlich
  • Studentisch
  • Jahr Alle 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008
  • Termine

    MediaMonday: Social Media @ Deutsche Bahn-Personenverkehr

    Yvonne Lenger ist Alumna der Hochschule Darmstadt und arbeitet heute für das Social Media-Team der Bahn. Im Rahmen ihres Vortrags „Social Media @ Deutsche Bahn-Personenverkehr“ am 17. Dezember erläutert sie, warum Social Media-Kanäle wichtige Kommunikationswege für den Austausch mit Kundinnen und Kunden sind.

    Termin:
    Montag, 17.12.2018
    Social Media @ Deutsche Bahn-Personenverkehr
    Yvonne...

    Mehr erfahren

    Yvonne Lenger ist Alumna der Hochschule Darmstadt und arbeitet heute für das Social Media-Team der Bahn. Im Rahmen ihres Vortrags „Social Media @ Deutsche Bahn-Personenverkehr“ am 17. Dezember erläutert sie, warum Social Media-Kanäle wichtige Kommunikationswege für den Austausch mit Kundinnen und Kunden sind.

    Termin:
    Montag, 17.12.2018
    Social Media @ Deutsche Bahn-Personenverkehr
    Yvonne Lenger, Online-Redakteurin bei der Deutschen Bahn

    Veranstaltungsort:
    Campuskino (Haus F 14, Raum 15/003, Max-Planck-Straße 2). Die Veranstaltungen beginnen jeweils um 17.45 Uhr und enden gegen 19.00 Uhr. Im Anschluss gibt es Snacks und Getränke im studentisch betriebenen Café „Zeitraum“.

    "Kommunikation und PR in Zeiten von Selbstvermarktung und Fake News“ ist das Motto des diesjährigen „MediaMonday“ am Mediencampus der Hochschule Darmstadt (h_da) in Dieburg. Vom 5. November an bis Mitte Dezember berichten Referentinnen und Referenten immer montags aus ihrem Arbeitsfeld.

    Alle Informationen gibt es auf der Website.

    Kracauer Lectures Wintersemester 2018 / 19

    Tami Williams about

    Belle Époque Paris was the epicenter of a diverse reevaluation and reconfiguration of suggestive forms that galvanized the art world, bringing innovative musical compositions, exhilarating dance forms, new pictorial models and widespread theatrical renovation. Germaine Dulac, an early theater critic, feminist filmmaker, and pioneer of an aesthetics of suggestion and...

    Mehr erfahren

    Tami Williams about

    ReViewing 1920s Cinematic Impressionism: Germaine Dulac’s Adaptation of Ibsen’s “The Master Builder” or the False Ideal of a Cinema without Theater

    Belle Époque Paris was the epicenter of a diverse reevaluation and reconfiguration of suggestive forms that galvanized the art world, bringing innovative musical compositions, exhilarating dance forms, new pictorial models and widespread theatrical renovation. Germaine Dulac, an early theater critic, feminist filmmaker, and pioneer of an aesthetics of suggestion and sensation, made over 30 fiction films, many marking new cinematic tendencies, from impressionist to abstract. A look at the mid-1920s genesis and context of her unrealized film adaptation of Ibsen’s iconic theater play, The Master Builder-1892, renews our perspective of French cinematic impressionism.

    Dulac’s Solness le Constructeur/The Master Builder was written in mid-1920s Paris, at the height of avant-garde calls for “cinematic specificity,” and “pure cinema,” a conversation during which notions of “aesthetic idealism” were playing out against “modernist skepticism,” as they had for Ibsen prior. Yet, historical accounts of the 1920s French avant-garde around issues of medium specificity, or the “false ideal” of a cinema without theater, tend to erase a crucial distinction between the traditional and the modern, boulevard theater and symbolist theater, and obscure cinema’s assimilation of modern theater forms, exemplified by Dulac’s Ibsenian adaptation.

    Symbolist theater’s minimalist acting, its disjunction of word and image via off-scene narration, and its emphasis on abstraction, suggestion, and sensation, are just a few of the critical influences on the suggestive stylistic practices of a socially progressive 1920s French art cinema. Taking inspiration from her unrealized project, The Master Builder, and the Ibsenian notion of a “false ideal,”—for Dulac, that of a cinema without theater, this essay attempts to redress this historiographic disjuncture and to reestablish the influence of Symbolist theatrical scenography and performance on 1920s French Impressionist cinema.


    Tami Williams is Associate Professor of Film Studies and English at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and president of Domitor – the International Society for the Study of Early Cinema. She is the author of Germaine Dulac: A Cinema of Sensations (2014), co-editor of Global Cinema Networks (2018), editor of The Moving Image, 16.1: Early Cinema and the Archives (2016), and co-editor of Performing New Media, 1895-1915 (2014). She also is a coordinator for the Women Film Pioneers Project (France) and the Media Ecology Project: Library of Congress Paper Print Pilot (Dartmouth).


    Venue: Casino, Raum 1.811
    Campus Westend, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

    All Lectures are online here


    Kracauer Lectures Wintersemester 2018 / 19

    Julia Noordegraaf about

    Over the past two decades, academic and cultural heritage institutions have made significant progress in the digitization of audiovisual media content and related materials, such as archival records, newspapers and program guides. In correspondence to these digitization efforts, media scholars have increasingly adopted software available for the creation of databases...

    Mehr erfahren

    Julia Noordegraaf about

    Digital Archives and Methods for Media Historiography

    Over the past two decades, academic and cultural heritage institutions have made significant progress in the digitization of audiovisual media content and related materials, such as archival records, newspapers and program guides. In correspondence to these digitization efforts, media scholars have increasingly adopted software available for the creation of databases with structured data on various aspects of the production, distribution and reception contexts. And finally, various new tools have been developed for exploring these new, digital collections and analyzing the data contained in them, such as tools for text mining, image analysis, geographical mapping or network visualization (Ross et al. 2009; Acland and Hoyt 2016). In combination, these advances enable the development of new forms of analysis, which were very difficult in the past, such as exploring large audiovisual collections for historical trends in genre and visual idiom, or tracing evolving political and cultural narratives in such collections across different media and over longer periods of time. At the same time, during their digitization and subsequent processing in computational tools for search, analysis and visualization, analogue sources are transformed in ways that influence their status as sources of knowledge and that require new forms of literacy to assess the impact of these transformations on interpreting them.

    This lecture focuses on the epistemological and methodological consequences of working with digitized archival sources and digital tools in media historical research. It is based on ongoing research in the field of digital media historiography and recent experiences with building the CLARIAH Media Suite, part of the Dutch national infrastructure for digital humanities research. Such a reflection starts at the archive: the context in which these sources have been collected, preserved, organized and made accessible. How do media objects transform with digitization, what information is lost, what is added? Second, I focus on the interfaces that provide access to digitized archival collections, analyzing the ways in which they allow researchers to assess the archival processing of the underlying material. Finally, I reflect on the new methods needed to work with these digitized collections in the practice of media historical research.


    Julia Noordegraaf is professor of Digital Heritage in the department of Media Studies at the University of Amsterdam. She is director of the Amsterdam Centre for Cultural Heritage and Identity (ACHI), one of the university’s research priority areas, where she leads the digital humanities research program Creative Amsterdam (CREATE) that studies the history of urban creativity using digital data and methods. Noordegraaf’s research focuses on the preservation and reuse of audiovisual and digital heritage.

    She has published, amongst others, the monograph Strategies of Display (2004/2012) and, as principal editor, Preserving and Exhibiting Media Art (2013) and acts as principal editor of the Cinema Context database on Dutch film culture. She currently leads research projects on the conservation of digital art (in the Horizon 2020 Marie Curie ITN project NACCA) and on the reuse of digital heritage in data-driven historical research (besides CREATE in the Amsterdam Data Science Research project Perspectives on Data Quality and the new, NWO funded project Virtual Interiors as Interfaces for Big Historical Data Research). She is a former fellow of the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities and Social Sciences and acts as board member for Media Studies in CLARIAH, the national infrastructure for digital humanities research, funded by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research, NWO. Noordegraaf currently coordinates the realization of the Amsterdam Time Machine and participates as Steering Committee member in the European Time Machine project that aims to build a simulator for 5.000 years of European history.


    Venue: Casino, Raum 1.811
    Campus Westend, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

    All Lectures are online here


    In Kooperation mit dem BMBF-Projekt „Die universitäre Sammlung als lebendes Archiv –
Lehre und Forschung im Spannungsfeld von Materialität und Medialität“

    Tim Griffin: Akermans Dispositionen

    Ursprünglich wollte Chantal Akerman einen Film über William Faulkner drehen. Was sie im amerikanischen Süden fand, brachte sie dazu, das Projekt neu zu disponieren. Sud (1999) ist ein Dokumentarfilm über die Auswirkungen des Lynchmordes an James Byrd Jr. Im Jahr 1998 auf die Bewohner der Stadt Jasper, Texas.
    Tim Griffin ist Leiter und Chefkurator des New Yorker Kunst- und Performanceraums The...

    Mehr erfahren

    Ursprünglich wollte Chantal Akerman einen Film über William Faulkner drehen. Was sie im amerikanischen Süden fand, brachte sie dazu, das Projekt neu zu disponieren. Sud (1999) ist ein Dokumentarfilm über die Auswirkungen des Lynchmordes an James Byrd Jr. Im Jahr 1998 auf die Bewohner der Stadt Jasper, Texas.

    Tim Griffin ist Leiter und Chefkurator des New Yorker Kunst- und Performanceraums The Kitchen, wo er u.a. 2013 Chantal Akermans Ausstellung „Maniac Shadows“ veranwortete. Griffin erwarb seinen Abschluss in Literatur am Bard College und war von 2003 bis 2010 Chefredakteur der Zeitschrift Artforum.

    Vortrag in englischer Sprache.
    Im Anschluß Film: Sud, F/B 1999, 71 min.

    Ort: Kino des Deutschen Filmmuseums, Schaumainkai 41, Frankfurt am Main. Platzzahl beschränkt. Kartenreservierungen empfohlen unter 069 961 220-220.

    Chen Sheinberg: Körper in Bewegung im Raum: TOUTE UNE NUIT

    Toute une Nuit ist ein Film der Körpersprache, in dem kleine Gesten von Begehren und Verlust in stilisierter Form in unterschiedlichen Paarkonstellationen an verschiedenen Orten in einer nächtlichen Stadt wiederholt und variiert werden.

    Dieser Vortrag geht der Frage nach, wie Chantal Akerman körperliche Bewegung als Stilmittel einsetzt und macht den Versuch die Bewegung von Figurengruppen...

    Mehr erfahren

    Toute une Nuit ist ein Film der Körpersprache, in dem kleine Gesten von Begehren und Verlust in stilisierter Form in unterschiedlichen Paarkonstellationen an verschiedenen Orten in einer nächtlichen Stadt wiederholt und variiert werden.

    Dieser Vortrag geht der Frage nach, wie Chantal Akerman körperliche Bewegung als Stilmittel einsetzt und macht den Versuch die Bewegung von Figurengruppen innerhalb des Bildausschnitts in unterschiedlichen Situationen als Ergebnis von Akermans einzigartiger filmischen Choreographie zu lesen. Zugleich wird der Vortrag dem Ton als Element dieser Choreographie besondere Aufmerksamkeit widmen.

    Chen Sheinberg ist Regisseur von Experimental- und Dokumentarfilmen, Kurator und Dozent in Tel Aviv. Seine filmischen Arbeiten wurden in der Londoner Whitechapel Gallery und an den Festivals Rotterdam und Oberhausen gezeigt. Für das Center for Contemporary Art in Te Aviv kuratierte er u.a. Filmreihen über Hollywood und die Avant-Garde sowie eine Retrospektive der Werke von Chantal Akerman.

    Vortrag in englischer Sprache.

    Film: Toute une Nuit, B/F 1982, 99 min.

    Ort: Kino des Deutschen Filmmuseums, Schaumainkai 41, Frankfurt am Main. Platzzahl beschränkt. Kartenreservierungen empfohlen unter 069 961 220-220.

    Patricia White. Die Einzigartigkeit von Chantal Akermans JE TU IL ELLE

    Chantal Akerman drehte Je tu il elle schnell, fast in Eile, um der Schauspielerin Delphine Seyrig, mit der sie Jeanne Dielman drehen würde, eine Probe ihres Talents zu liefern. 
    Die Liebesszene zwischen der Hauptfigur Julie, gespielt von Akerman selbst, und einer anderen Frau, bleibt ein Meilenstein in der Geschichte der filmischen Darstellung lesbischer Liebe. Dieser Vortrag zeichnet die...

    Mehr erfahren

    Chantal Akerman drehte Je tu il elle schnell, fast in Eile, um der Schauspielerin Delphine Seyrig, mit der sie Jeanne Dielman drehen würde, eine Probe ihres Talents zu liefern. 

    Die Liebesszene zwischen der Hauptfigur Julie, gespielt von Akerman selbst, und einer anderen Frau, bleibt ein Meilenstein in der Geschichte der filmischen Darstellung lesbischer Liebe. Dieser Vortrag zeichnet die Bedeutung dieses Films für Akermans Werk und das Kino im Ganzen nach, in dem er autobiographische Elemente in Akermans Werk und Auftritte der Regisseurin vor der Kamera auf dieses außergewöhnliche Langfilmdebüt zurück führt.

    Patricia White ist Eugene Lang Research Professor und Chair of Film and Media Studies am Swarthmore College. Zu ihren Büchern zählen Women’s Cinema/World Cinema: Projecting Contemporary Feminisms (Duke University Press, 2015) und Uninvited: Classical Hollywood Cinema and Lesbian Representability (Indiana University Press, 1999. Sie ist Mitherausgeberin der führenden feministischen Filmzeitschrift Camera Obscura, deren 100. Ausgabe Chantal Akerman gewidmet ist und im März 2019 erscheint.

    Filmvorführung: Je Tu Il Elle, B/F 1974, 86 min.

    Vortrag in englischer Sprache.

    Die Reihe findet im Kino des Deutschen Filminstituts & Filmmuseums statt (Schaumainkai 41, Frankfurt am Main). Eintritt: 5 €. Platzzahl beschränkt. Kartenreservierungen empfohlen unter: 069 / 961 220-220.

    An Evening with Babette Mangolte

    „Schon als Kind war ich extrem interessiert am Theater, und in meinen ersten Jahren in New York entdeckte ich zudem den Tanz. Ein heraustechender Zug der Arbeit von Pina Bausch ist die Kombination von beidem. Mich interessiert das Problem, wie man eine Live-Vorführung filme kann, ohne dass es statisch wirkt.“
    Babette Mangolte ist Kamerafrau und Filmemacherin in New York und Professorin an der...

    Mehr erfahren

    „Schon als Kind war ich extrem interessiert am Theater, und in meinen ersten Jahren in New York entdeckte ich zudem den Tanz. Ein heraustechender Zug der Arbeit von Pina Bausch ist die Kombination von beidem. Mich interessiert das Problem, wie man eine Live-Vorführung filme kann, ohne dass es statisch wirkt.“

    Babette Mangolte ist Kamerafrau und Filmemacherin in New York und Professorin an der University of California in San Diego. Sie hat mehrere Filme mit Chantal Akerman realisiert, darunter Jeanne Dielman und News from Home. Ihre eigenen Filmarbeiten kreisen u.a. um Fragen der Choreographie und der Performance.

    Filmvorführung: 

    18 Uhr: What Maisie Knew (USA 1975), 60 min., Steve Paxton at Dia (USA 2014), 8 min., Staging Lateral Pass (USA 2013), 31 min., R: Babette Mangolte,

    20 Uhr: Un jour Pina a demandé, B/F 1974, R: Chantal Akerman, 60 min.

    Sonia Campanini. Follow me quietly. Akermans Poetik von Raum und Bewegung

    In ihrem ersten langen Film Hotel Monterey (1972) dokumentiert Chantal Akerman eine Nacht in einem billigen Hotel auf der Upper East Side in Manhattan. Sie erkundet das Hotel von unten bis oben: die Lobby und die Lounge, die dunklen Aufzüge, die spärlich erleuchteten Korridore und Flure, die kargen Zimmer. Diese Räume rahmt sie in langen, stillen Einstellungen, in einem Stil, der den...

    Mehr erfahren

    In ihrem ersten langen Film Hotel Monterey (1972) dokumentiert Chantal Akerman eine Nacht in einem billigen Hotel auf der Upper East Side in Manhattan. Sie erkundet das Hotel von unten bis oben: die Lobby und die Lounge, die dunklen Aufzüge, die spärlich erleuchteten Korridore und Flure, die kargen Zimmer. Diese Räume rahmt sie in langen, stillen Einstellungen, in einem Stil, der den Dokumentarfilm mit dem Experimentalfilm zusammen bringt. In ähnlicher Weise wie auch im Kurzfilm La Chambre beobachtet die Kamera den Raum mit poetischer Geste und wird zur Zeugin der vielfältigen Bezüge zwischen den Räumen und ihren Bewohner.

    Sonia Campanini ist Juniorprofessorin für Filmkultur an der Goethe-Universität, wo sie für den Studiengang “Filmkultur: Archivierung, Programmierung, Präsentation” verantwortlich ist.

    Filmvorführung: Hotel Monterey, B/USA 1973, 62 min., und La Chambre, B/USA, 11 min.

    Die Reihe findet im Kino des Deutschen Filminstituts & Filmmuseums statt (Schaumainkai 41, Frankfurt am Main). Eintritt: 5 €. Platzzahl beschränkt. Kartenreservierungen empfohlen unter: 069 / 961 220-220.

    Alisa Lebow. Distanz rahmen: NEWS FROM HOME

    Chantal Akermans News from Home wird mitunter als Liebeserklärung an ihre Mutter beschrieben, kann aber auch als Darstellung einer Distanzerfahrung verstanden werden. Während die damals 27 Jahre alte Akerman die täglichen Briefe ihrer Mutter laut vorliest, sehen wir Szenen aus einer gänzlich anderen Welt. Der Zwiespalt könnte kaum offensichtlicher sein. 
    Der Film ist zugleich ein Dokument...

    Mehr erfahren

    Chantal Akermans News from Home wird mitunter als Liebeserklärung an ihre Mutter beschrieben, kann aber auch als Darstellung einer Distanzerfahrung verstanden werden. Während die damals 27 Jahre alte Akerman die täglichen Briefe ihrer Mutter laut vorliest, sehen wir Szenen aus einer gänzlich anderen Welt. Der Zwiespalt könnte kaum offensichtlicher sein. 

    Der Film ist zugleich ein Dokument einer sehr eigenen Anschauung von New York und einer Beziehung zwischen einer Mutter und einer Tochter, die höchst unterschiedliche Leben führen. Die Distanz ist eine physische und psychische, die in den Zwischenräumen zwischen Ton und Bild lesbar wird.

    Alisa Lebow ist Filmwissenschaftlerin und Filmemacherin und lehrt an der University of Sussex. Sie ist Spezialistin für Dokumentarfilm und befasst sich besonders mit den dokumentarischen Arbeiten von Chantal Akerman. Ihr jüngstes Projekt, “Filming Revolution” (Stanford University Press, 2018) ist eine interactive, webbasierte studie zur Filmproduktion in Ägypten seit der Revolution (http://filmingrevolution.supdigital.org/).

    Filmvorführung: News from Home, F/B 1977, 98 min.

    Vortrag in englischer Sprache.

    Die Reihe findet im Kino des Deutschen Filminstituts & Filmmuseums statt (Schaumainkai 41, Frankfurt am Main). Eintritt: 5 €. Platzzahl beschränkt. Kartenreservierungen empfohlen unter: 069 / 961 220-220.


    Laliv Melamed. Hier/Da: Chantel Akermans LA-BAS

    “Wenn ich aus dem Fenster schaue, gehe ich ganz in mich hinein”, sagt Chantal Akerman in ihrem Film LÀ-BAS von 2006. Einer Einladung folgend, hielt sie sich für einige Wochen in Tel Aviv auf. Die meiste Zeit schloss sie sich in ihre Wohnung ein und richtete die Kamera auf die Sicht aus dem Fenster der Wohnung. Das „dort unten“ des Titels bezieht sich auf die Straße draußen, aber auch auf einen...

    Mehr erfahren

    “Wenn ich aus dem Fenster schaue, gehe ich ganz in mich hinein”, sagt Chantal Akerman in ihrem Film LÀ-BAS von 2006. Einer Einladung folgend, hielt sie sich für einige Wochen in Tel Aviv auf. Die meiste Zeit schloss sie sich in ihre Wohnung ein und richtete die Kamera auf die Sicht aus dem Fenster der Wohnung. Das „dort unten“ des Titels bezieht sich auf die Straße draußen, aber auch auf einen Platz jenseits des Sichtbaren, einen inneren, imaginären Ort. In dem sie nach draußen schaut, richtet Akerman unsere Aufmerksamkeit nicht nur auf die befremdliche Gegenwart Israels, die sie vom Fenster aus sehen kann, sondern auch auf das Versprechen einer Zukunft, das Israel einmal gab. 

    Die Spannung zwischen Innen und Außen, zwischen Hier und Da in Akermans Film lässt sich als paradigmatisch für ein kritisches Nachdenken über die konfliktreiche Realität Israels verstehen.

    Laliv Melamed ist Post-Doc-Forscherin am Graduiertenkolleg “Konfigurationen des Films” an der Goethe-Universitt Frankfurt. Sie promovierte in Filmwissenschaft an der New York University und war research fellow am Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics der Universität Tel Aviv. 

    Sie ist außerdem Kuratorin und Programmgestalterin für Docaviv, das Tel Aviv Documentary Film Festival.

    Filmvorführung: LÀ-BAS, B/F 2006, 78 min.

    Vortrag in englischer Sprache.

    Die Reihe findet im Kino des Deutschen Filminstituts & Filmmuseums statt (Schaumainkai 41, Frankfurt am Main). Eintritt: 5 €. Platzzahl beschränkt. Kartenreservierungen empfohlen unter: 069 / 961 220-220.